Preeclampsia - Chicago Medical Malpractice

Medical Malpractice Cases Involving Preeclampsia 

Preeclampsia is potentially deadly medical condition that can develop during pregnancy. In fact, preeclampsia is the second leading cause of maternal death in the United States. Preeclampsia is also fetal complications, including still-birth, premature birth, and birth injury. The signs and symptoms of preeclampsia are high blood pressure and/or excess protein in the urine (or protienuria) after twenty weeks of pregnancy in women with normal blood pressure before pregnancy. Obstetricians and other medical staff must not only know these signs and symptoms preeclampsia, they must know how to manage the condition and, when indicated, treat the condition immediately. Chicago medical malpractice lawyer Jason M. Kroot has successfully prosecuted many pregnancy complication cases, including those involving preeclampsia that have resulted in birth injury and wrongful death.

The Cure For Preeclmapsia Is Delivery

When a preeclampsia is diagnosed, the only cure is to deliver the baby. Delivering the baby is not a difficult decision when the baby is full term. The decision becomes complicated if the condition is diagnosed early in pregnancy. The doctor and pregnancy patient must balance the need for the baby to continue maturing with the need to avoid putting the pregnancy patient and baby at risk of serious complication from preeclampsia. A knowledge and skilled obstetrician can guide the pregnant patient through this challenging period.

Treating Preeclampsia Before and After Delivery

Preeclampsia can be treated before and after delivery. Two fundamental goals of treating preeclampsia are to stabilize blood pressure and avoid seizures. Although blood pressures usually begin subsiding after delivery, this is not always true. In addition, doctors may continue to give post-partum patients anti-seizure medication for a period of time. Likewise, doctors may also order anti-hypertensive medication if blood pressures do not stabilize or stabilize and then return to elevated.

Eclampsia / Preeclampsia Seizures

Doctors must not let the guard down if a preeclamptic patient’s blood pressure begins to come down after delivery. After all, preeclampstic patients may have their blood pressure go down for a few days only to return to an elevated status. Indeed, a patient can still have preeclampsia even after their blood pressures stabilize. Once again, a key concern with preeclamptic patients is to avoid seizures. If a patient has preeclampsia and experiences seizures, this is called eclampsia. Eclampsia is a very dangerous condition that requires extreme care, urgent treatment, and vigilant monitoring. Treatment for eclampsia includes the use of anti-seizure medication to prevent any further seizure activity. Depending upon blood pressure levels, doctors may also order anti-hypertensive medication to control blood pressure levels.

Contacting a Chicago Medical Malpractice Lawyer

As described above, preeclampsia is serious medical condition that requires careful monitoring and, often times, prompt treatment. If you are a loved one has suffered serious injury or wrongful death as a result of preeclampsia or eclampsia, it is important to contact a medical malpractice attorney with the knowledge, skill and experience to handled these complicated malpractice cases. Chicago medical malpractice attorney Jason M. Kroot has a proven record of results in medical malpractice cases, while providing uncommon personal service. For further information, we invite you to contact Chicago preeclampsia lawyer Jason M. Kroot for a free consultation and case evaluation.

 
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