Illinois Doctor Disciplinary Flaws Increase Medical Malpractice Possibility

April 17, 2011

According to a recent Chicago Tribune article, the inherent flaws in Illinois' doctor disciplinary measures are allowing doctors with criminal records and a number of medical malpractice lawsuits to continue practicing despite their records. The article uses the state' failure to adequately discipline Dr. Angelo Consiglio as a prime example of how Illinois current disciplinary policies are failing patients. After groping and forcefully kissing a patient in his Carol Stream office, Consiglio plead guilty to battery a year later and had his medical license suspended for four months.

The Tribune discovered that Consiglio has now moved to the Florida Keys and is looking to have his criminal record sealed as he starts up a practice in Florida. Consiglio has also acknowledged sexual liaisons with at least three other female patients in Illinois, according to records obtained by the Tribune. State regulators claim that they were unaware of his other relations with patients. Regulators in Florida learned of these other circumstances by requesting records from counseling sessions stemming from the battery charges.

The article details that police arrested Consiglio after a four-month investigation when he made incriminating statements during phone conversations with the victim that detectives had secretly recorded. After entering a guilty plea and settling with the woman in the groping case Consiglio's license was suspended for four months. He was placed on professional probation for 14 months, but allowed to practice as long as he had a chaperone in the room with female patients. He also had to complete a course on appropriate professional conduct, seek counseling and submitted quarterly compliance reports. The Chicago medical malpractice lawyer representing the woman said that she was unable to comment on the case against the doctor because of the settlement agreement but that the woman was opposed to allowing him to clear his record.

The Tribune article supports reform amongst Illinois regulators in their disciplinary policies and procedures in an attempt to reduce medical malpractice and to protect patients. According to the consumer advocate group Public Citizen, which studied doctor disciplinary actions nationwide between the years of 1990 and 2009, Illinois ranks eighth-worst in the total number of undisciplined doctors.

 
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